Unified national strategy for animal feeding operations by United States. Environmental Protection Agency

Cover of: Unified national strategy for animal feeding operations | United States. Environmental Protection Agency

Published by United States Dept. of Agriculture, United States Environment Protection Agency in Washington, D.C.?] .

Written in English

Read online

Subjects:

  • Animal waste,
  • Government policy,
  • Manures,
  • Feedlot runoff,
  • Animal feeding,
  • Agricultural pollution

Edition Notes

Book details

Other titlesU.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency unified national strategy for animal feeding operations
StatementU.S. Dept. of Agriculture, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
ContributionsUnited States. Department of Agriculture
The Physical Object
Paginationi, 52 p. ;
Number of Pages52
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25901343M
OCLC/WorldCa42851331

Download Unified national strategy for animal feeding operations

Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Operations March 9, The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) prohibit discrimination in their programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, sexual orientation, or :// Printed copies of the Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Operations may be obtained by calling USDA on () or EPA on () Click here to view the full AFO Strategy.

?Dockey=   USDA-EPA Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Operations Animal feeding operations (AFOs) can pose a number of risks to water quality and public health, mainly because of the amount of animal manure and wastewater they generate. To minimize water quality and public health impacts from AFOs and land application of animal waste, the U.S Inthe Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Operations directed the USDA and U.S.

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to work together to address environmental and public health issues associated with animal feeding operations (AFO)?hid=   Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have generated more land-use controversy than most rural areas have seen in decades.

They often locate in communities that lack the planning and zoning tools to deal with their impacts. Matters are often complicated by state laws limiting local zoning authority over :// Inthe U.S.

Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released a joint "Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Operations"(Strategy), which presented a plan for addressing the potential water quality and public health impacts associated with ://?cid=nrcs but runoff from city streets, agricultural operations, and other sources continues to pollute water.

In Marchthe EPA and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) completed a strategy for livestock operations. The Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Operations represented the EPA and USDA plan   How do pollutants from poultry and livestock operations reach surface waters.

How is the proposed regulations for CAFOs related to the USDA/EPA Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Operations. Existing Regulations When were the existing NPDES CAFO regulations promulgated.

What is an AFO under the existing regulation. released a joint “Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Operations” (Strategy), which presented a plan for addressing the potential water Unified national strategy for animal feeding operations book and public health impacts associated with AFOs.

The Strategy recognized the complementary roles to be played by voluntary and regulatory programs. Impor-   agency, unified national strategy for animal feeding operations (Draft, Sept.

11, ) (announcing a proposed strategy that the federal government will be more active with mandatory and voluntary programs regarding AFOs); ?article=&context=mlr. On March 9, the U.S. Department of Agriculture-U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Operations was announced.

The AFO strategy sets forth a range of flexible, common-sense actions to minimize water quality and Unified national strategy for animal feeding operations book health impacts of animal feeding operations, while ensuring long-term sustainability   Permit for Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) pursuant to the recently released USDA/EPA Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Opera-tions.

While this draft guidance has no legal effect, it explains EPA’s approach to enforcing existing law and regulations governing CAFOs. EPA has requested Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Operations - Document sets forth a framework of actions, for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and EPA under existing legal and regulatory authority, to reduce impacts to water quality and public health from improperly managed animal ://   National Center for Agricultural Law Research and Information The National Center for Agricultural Law Research and Information (Center) was created in under Public LawStat.

to address the complex legal issues that A. Inthe Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Operations directed USDA and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to work together to address environmental and public health issues associated with animal feeding operations (AFOs).

The strategy also defined the CNMP and the relationship between voluntary and regulatory ?content=wba. unified national strategy8 to minimize the water quality impacts of confined “animal feeding operations.” The unified national strategy, issued in Marchestablishes an expectation that all of the approximatelyanimal feeding operations nationwide will develop and implement comprehensive nutrient management plans by USDA & EPA Unified National AFO Strategy: Executive Summary, March 9, (PDF) (5 pp, 60 K) USDA & EPA Unified National AFO Strategy: Entire Document, March 9, (PDF) (34 pp, K) Spanish Version: Estrategia Nacional Unificada para Operaciones de Alimentación Animal, March 9, (PDF) (48 pp, K) This Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Operations presents USDA and EPA's plan for addressing the water quality and public health impacts associated with AFOs.

USDA and EPA issued a draft of this Strategy on Septem, and requested public comment during a day ://?Dockey= The USDA and the EPA issued the Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Operations to protect and minimize the effects of agriculture on water quality and public health while maintaining long term sustainable agriculture.

By understanding and executing the National Strategy, a healthy relationship between water quality and agriculture can   In animal husbandry, a concentrated animal feeding operation (CAFO), as defined by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), is an intensive animal feeding operation (AFO) in which over animal units are confined for over 45 days a year.

An animal unit is the equivalent of pounds of "live" animal weight. A thousand animal units equates to cows, cows used for Provides information about how the permit program interacts with other CWA programs to protect and improve water quality, and provides resources for professionals working in the program at the federal, state, local, and firm level, and concerned ://   USDA and EPA () cooperated on a Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Operations, which establishes a national goal (to minimize water pollution from confinement facilities and land application of manure) and performance expectations (Comprehensive Nutrient Management Plans, CNMPs) for :// For example, a EPA study fo miles of streams in 22 states polluted with biological wastes from concentrated animal feeding operations.

The number of “impaired waters” in Iowa has tripled since the late s, as industrial farming systems, such as The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are seeking comments on the draft Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Operations.

USDA and EPA are asking for comments from individuals, the livestock industry, State, Tribal, and local The unified national strategy, part of the Clinton Administration’s Clean Water Action Plan, seeks to minimize threats to water quality and public health caused by animal feeding operations, while ensuring the long-term sustainability of livestock production in the United :// Notice is hereby given that the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U.S.

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will conduct 11 public listening sessions where interested individuals can ask questions and provide feedback on the draft Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding   The Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Operations suggests that AFOs not meeting animal unit requirements as CAFOs, should still be required to have NPDES permits because of: (1) significant manure production; (2) unacceptable conditions; or (3) significant contributions to impaired water quality.

U.S. Dep't of Agric., U.S. Envtl. ://   Phosphorus (P), an essential nutrient for crop and animal production, can accelerate freshwater eutrophication, now one of the most ubiquitous forms of water quality impairment in the developed world.

Repeated outbreaks of harmful algal blooms (e.g., Cyanobacteria and Pfiesteria) have increased society's awareness of eutrophication, and the need for solutions. Agriculture is regarded   runoff or other discharges from animal feeding operations.

Considerable attention has been given to this issue recently, as evidenced by the recent issuance of a national unified animal feeding operation (AFO) strategy by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.

Department of Agriculture (USDA). Animal Feeding Operations (AFOs) are agricultural operations where animals are kept and raised in confined situations.

An AFO is a lot or facility (other than an aquatic animal production facility) where the following conditions are met: animals have been, are, or will be stabled or confined and fed or maintained for a total of 45 days or more   such.

In the United States, the USDA/EPA Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Operations outlines how animal feeding operations should be regulated and acknowledges that land application at proper agronomic rates is the preferred use for manures.

However, many   national concern that require science-based assessment and response. As part of the Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding developed under mandate of the Clean Water Action Plan, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S.

Environmental Protection Agency, together with other Federal partners, were   Based on its own national conditions and food availability, China has embarked on a road to establishing food security in its own way by implementing the concepts of innovative, coordinated, green, open, and inclusive development, the requirements of high   of Agriculture issued a Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Operations in response to pub-lic concern about contamination of rivers, lakes, streams, coastal waters, and groundwater from Small Flows Quarterly, SpringVolume 2, Number 2, * Management National Introduction Animal Feeding Operations (AFOs) are agricultural operations where animals are housed, fed, and cared for in barns or other confined space.

Nationwide, it is estimated there are over ,00 AFOs. The vast majority of these operations do not confine enough animals to meet the definition of Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) as defined in the The J. Paxton Marshall Papers collection contains papers, reports and publications on land use issues in Virginia and surrounding states, as well as a small amount of biographical material.

The documents included relate to Marshall's tenure in the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics at Virginia Tech (), as well as his work with various committees and as a technical ?docId=vt/viblbvxml.

associated with animal feeding operations. The concern is that animal agriculture has been identified as a nonpoint source pollutant contributor in many watersheds across the nation.

The recently released USDA/EPA Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Operations (AFOs) set a national expectation that all AFO owners and Feeding Operations AFOs and the.

Due to increased pressure for environmental sensitivity, the United States Department of Agriculture-United States Environmental Protection Agency (USDA-EPA) adopted the Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Operations (USEPA, ). This strategy has serious implications for :// Air and water quality concerns that arise primarily from the under-utilization or inefficient use of manure contribute to these changing views.

How-ever, when properly used, manure is a resource and should be regulated as such. In the United States, the USDA/EPA Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Operations outlines how ?doi=   March – Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Operations – joint report by USDA and EPA released.

Established National Performance Expectation. All AFO Owners/Operators To Develop and Implement A CNMP. Defined six elements of a CNMP. Feed Management - Land Management. Manure Handling and Storage - Record Keeping   Web view.

animal feeding operations, and other animal feeding operations designated as concentrated feeding operations, are subject to the NPDES permitting program.

In addition, the State of New Jersey Administarative Code (N.J.A.C. A) requires CAFOs and other designated AFOs to obtain a NJPDES permit for their ://Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Operations.

To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please submit an Update/Correction/Removal ://  To accomplish this goal, a unified strategy has been established as a national performance expectation: All animal feeding operations should develop and implement technically sound and economically feasible comprehensive nutrient management plans (CNMPs) to minimize impacts on water quality and public health (8).+Feedlot+Contributions+to+Groundwater.

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